?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous 20

Oct. 14th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Giusto Pio - Motore Immobile

A masterpiece of 1970s Italian minimalism, Motore Immobile is scored for organ, violin and voice. The voice is little more than a wordless hum, and the violin is barely audible behind the long keyboard drones. Long sections of tranquil beauty are connected by strange and uncomfortable harmonic modulations, and the whole thing is reminiscent of the pellucidity of Scelsi. Pio, who died in 2017, was a concert violinist, and went on to co-write a chart topping song for Eurovision.

Giusto Pio - Motore Immobile

Oct. 13th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Amon Düül II - Dem Guten, Schönen, Wahren

There's no denying that Phallus Dei (1969) was a groundbreaking record, an album that stands as one of the progenitors of krautrock. There's also no doubt that 50 years on it also sounds more than a little bit silly.

Of course, it always did. That homespun nature was always part of its charm, Lothar Meid's falsetto on Dem Guten, Schönen, Wahren was meant to be preposterously theatrical. Maybe we can hear echoes of it in much of the dodgy prog that was to follow, but like Jodie Foster Amon Düül II can hardly be blamed for the crimes committed in their name - especially not when the squib guitar cuts in and we get the loudhailer vocals. A preposterous, glorious mess of a song.

Amon Düül II - Dem Guten, Schönen, Wahren
(alt)

Oct. 12th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Eiko Ishibashi and K2 - Cold Pastoral

Eiko Ishibashi is best known for being a singer/songwriter. Her music is pleasantly experimental, but not particularly the sort of thing we listen to here at Doklands. Kimihide Kusafuka AKA K2 however is a veteran industrial noise maker, and the two of them unexpectedly collaborated on the album Compressed Happiness (2014). From that record here is the lengthy, and frankly rather gorgeous, Cold Pastoral. It's a lengthy arrangement of howling feedback and tranquil organ drones, scraping whines and melodic ringing. At times delicate and at other almost unbearably loud, there's some top musical synergy here. Definitely recommended.

Eiko Ishibashi and K2 - Cold Pastoral
(alt)

Oct. 11th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Shida Shahabi - Pretty In Plums

Pretty In Plums comes from Shida Shahabi's Homes (2018). She's a Swedish/Iranian composer, and todays's track sounds as if it's plucked directly from a film soundtrack. It's got a very precise sense of time and place: the faded glamour of pre-revolutionary China. If your main intent was to spoil everyone's fun you could describe it as a work of musical tourism, but it's done with such fresh ears and with such a distinct patina of age that it sounds on some level like a critique. A lovely little number, and also I suspect rather a clever one.

Shida Shahabi - Pretty In Plums
(alt)

Oct. 10th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Matthais Schriefl - Luxemburg

The aesthetic of horn player Matthais Schriefl is a tricky one to pin down. It's part lush romantic jazz melodicism, part dirty metal, part jolly Alpine yodel tunes, and 100% mischief. I've yet to hear him go a-wandering down the mountain track, but I fear it can only be a matter of time. Really, I cannot stress enough how okay it is to not like this music. But give it a chance first, because I guarantee you that you will not hear anything even remotely like it anywhere else.

Here's Luxemburg from the album Keine Angst vor Shreefpunk (2018). The Shreefpunk regulars are joined by the string trio Netnakisum and Finnish guitarist Kalle Kalima. It's music that takes joy in its own bizarre nature, flitting between disjointed experimentation, satirical MOR smoothness and big fat muscular headbanging, all building to a joyous crescendo. It's European as fuck and so much fun.

Matthais Schriefl - Luxemburg
(alt)

Oct. 9th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Farai - Punk Champagne

What do you get when you mix Buckfast - that caffeinated fortified wine first made by Benedictine headbanger monks - with prosecco? The answer apparently is punk champagne, and the drink provides a platform for the amazing voice of Farai. Raised in South London, she's still got some of the sing-song intonation of her Zimbabwean roots, but does so with the force of a jet engine. Despite the gnarly electropunk keyboards, Punk Champagne is a relatively restrained number, but it'll slither into your subconscious and set roots. I'd love to hear her sing flintier, more focussed songs as I honestly rate her one of the voices of contemporary Britain.

Farai - Punk Champagne
(alt)

Oct. 8th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Hugh Cornwell & Robert Williams - Big Bug

It's 1979 and United Artists are worried about The Stranglers. What happens if the band goes under? They're going to lose out on a load of sales. Maybe they should test the waters with the band's frontman, Hugh Cornwell. See if they can pivot into making him a solo artist. So what does he do? He takes their advance and makes an avant-rock horror themed album with the drummer from Captain Beefheart's Magic Band.

Needless to say, Nosferatu did not sell well. There's a lot to love on there: the furious night ride of the title track, Ian Dury's sinister carnival barker, The Clash providing uncredited backing vocals as an army of puppets, or one of the great lost Devo songs. Today we're getting Big Bug, a showcase for Williams' offbeat rhythmic sensibilities. It's a massively syncopated tale of caterpillar horror nonsense with the sort of deep buried grooves I've not heard since. This is an odd song from an odd record and I adore it.

Hugh Cornwell & Robert Williams - Big Bug
(alt)

Oct. 7th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Au Pairs - Come Again

Post-punk was perhaps not the most sexy of the music genres, but there were exceptions. Their music may have been abrasive and spiky (and it really was), but just about every Au Pairs song isn't just about sex, it's deeply entrenched in sexual politics. Come Again from the band's 1981 debut Playing With a Different Sex might not be what you'd call erotic, but as a tale of bad sex, score-keeping, and performative sexuality it's pretty fucking incisive. And you can dance to it, awkwardly admittedly, but it still counts.

Au Pairs - Come Again
(alt)

Oct. 6th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Ayato and Kecap Tuyul - Wires Don't Cry

Good news: the Free Music Archive is back up and running, serving thousands of obscure artists for your listening pleasure. Still not a particularly good interface for discovering them though, and even if you could who has the time, eh? I like what I've heard so far from the duo of Ayato and Kecap Tuyul, who seem to be regular collaborators. On Wires Don't Cry from The Shaman Won't Come Back (2019), Ayato provides clipped, regular guitar for Tuyul's apocalyptic soundscape to run wild over. It's a terrific serving of rumbling noise, made all the more intense by the metronomic guitar work. These two complement each other very well.

Ayato and Kecap Tuyul - Wires Don't Cry
(alt)

Oct. 5th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Gowns - White Like Heaven

Genuinely rather narked that I didn't get to listen to Gowns while they were still around. White Like Heaven comes from their 2007 debut, Red State. It's music that pins you down, its electric drone a heavy narcotic blanket. Erika Anderson's vocals are trapped just like the people in the shitty town she's singing about. She can sing as much as she wants, Corey Fogel's drums can flurry and burst, but neither will never get the escape velocity required to leave the fucking suburbs. Obliteration music.

Gowns - White Like Heaven
(alt)

Oct. 4th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Robert Fripp - Hope

I've found the Frippiest thing ever. Robert Fripp has never sounded more like Robert Fripp than on Hope from the album Soundscape, a 1993 bootleg of a 1992 show in Tokyo. Superb recording quality yadda yadda yadda, but what gets you are those long perpetual motion steady picking runs with the aching keening wails surrounding them. Absolutely the essence of his style, and if you appreciate that I think you'll love Hope. It's got an understated beauty about it and a sorrow that Fripp has seldom equalled.

Robert Fripp - Hope
(alt)

Oct. 3rd, 2019

cyberinsekt

Ann Peebles - I Can't Stand The Rain

Of all the great soul songs, perhaps the one with the greatest disparity between vocals and orchestration is I Can't Stand The Rain by Ann Peebles. That break in her voice when she sings the word "rain", that's what makes it famous and it's worth every one of its listeners. But then there's the rubbery twang of the electronic intro, that I guess is meant to represent the sound of falling rain but actually sounds like a Pong console. It's such a shock to hear the song open with it, and even as it becomes subsumed into the rest of the instruments you'll never forget it's there. A much odder song than you remember.

Ann Peebles - I Can't Stand The Rain
(alt)

Oct. 2nd, 2019

cyberinsekt

Michele Mercure - Beginning

Taken from Beside Herself (2018), a compilation of cassette releases from the 1980s, Beginning is an elegant piece of underground electronic music. It won't change your mind about the sounds of the instruments used - never has a bass been more fretless - but it uses them particularly well.

Michele Mercure - Beginning
(alt)

Oct. 1st, 2019

cyberinsekt

Dick "Two Ton" Baker - Bert The Turtle (The Duck And Cover Song)

In 1951 people were told that all they needed to do to avoid dying in a nuclear fireball was to throw themselves to the floor and stick an old coat over their head. We laugh at their lack of sophistication, and ignore the fact that in 2017 people were told that all they needed to do to avoid dying from plastic in the food chain was to stop using drinking straws. One thing we perhaps don't have today is cheery propaganda along the lines of Bert The Turtle (The Duck And Cover Song) - or maybe we do but it's so well targeted that none of us jaded fucks are seeing it.

Ah, get out of here, don't let my mood ruin your day.

Dick "Two Ton" Baker - Bert The Turtle (The Duck And Cover Song)
(alt)

Sep. 30th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Scrapper Blackwell - Goin' Where The Monon Crosses The Yellow Dog

Scrapper Blackwell was an original 1920s bluesman. Unlike many of his contemporaries the following decades didn't kill him. He survived to see the start of the 1960s blues and folk revival, only to be murdered in an alley at the age of 59.

Goin' Where The Monon Crosses The Yellow Dog is one of his later pieces, and frankly it's an amazing song. Not only does he have that splintered, instrument-rending sound that Bill Orcutt has developed, he's also got some of the same melodic deconstruction going on there. He never leaves you in any doubt whatsoever about the physicality of playing the guitar. When singing he had a bit of a mushmouth thing going for him, but it worked. It's that extraordinary guitar we're here for though, if you've not heard him before you're going to be amazed.

Scrapper Blackwell - Goin' Where The Monon Crosses The Yellow Dog
(alt)

Sep. 29th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Grouper - The Races

In which Liz Harris sings accompanied only by the rumble of surface noise and the most physical of all reverbs. It's instantly nostalgic for the proto-shoegaze of early 4AD that we still called indie at the time, and over in under a minute. But it is lovely. From the 2018 album Grid of Points.

Grouper - The Races
(alt)

Sep. 28th, 2019

cyberinsekt

The Legendary Pink Dots - Just A Lifetime

You know how some bands have a brief prolific flurry of life, then go dormant for a few years, and finally end up releasing an album every now and then? The Legendary Pink Dots were never that band. For 38 years Edward Ka-Spel and his group have released record after record without pausing for breath. It's one of the most remarkable streaks of creativity in all of music, all the more so when considering the distinct lack of popular success the band have received over the years.

Just A Lifetime doesn't sound as if it was released in 1990. More to the point, there's no time this would have ever sounded contemporary. Maximalist psychedelia meets baroque electronic goth exists nowhere but the deep rabbithole of Legendary Pink Dots songs. It's from the album The Crushed Velvet Apocalypse.

The Legendary Pink Dots - Just A Lifetime
(alt)

Sep. 27th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Tim Hecker - This Life

Everything has been cut loose and is adrift in zero gravity, crashing into the walls. Tim Hecker's emotionally expressive sound design on This Life from Konoyo (2018) sets the listener in the middle of a slow motion storm of fear, confusion and remorse. Utterly contemporary.

Tim Hecker - This Life
(alt)

Sep. 26th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Masada - Beeroth

Just a quickie to let you know that the version of Beeroth from the Live in Sevilla 2000 album is roasting. Turbo speed klezmer jazz full of raw potency. It's a brilliantly crisp recording, and a reminder of just how great a rhythm unit Greg Cohen and Joey Baron were, humming with potential ready to be unleashed at any moment. God-tier excitement.

Masada - Beeroth
(alt)

Sep. 25th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Priests - No Big Bang

Not to disparage Katie Alice Greer as a singer - because she's pretty great - but I think my favourite Priests song might be No Big Bang. It's a half-spoken affair from their 2017 album Nothing Feels Natural. If you're not yet au fair with the politically charged punk of Priests than I suggest you get started right now. Really love Taylor Mulitz's insistent bass riff that runs throughout this like fugue thought: the sound of radical self-doubt.

Priests - No Big Bang
(alt)

Previous 20