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Aug. 19th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Nanine - Souie Baby Souie

I've only every known one pig. It would happily trot towards me every time it saw me and then try to eat whatever footwear I had. It wasn't trying to take a bite, more a sort of friendly nibble. My parents thought it hilarious and encouraged this kind of thing. Whatever the case, it certainly didn't need calling.

I've never understood pig calling, but apparently people compete to see who's best at it. I'd always assumed it was one of those fake activities that closed communities connived in to make the rest of the world think were serious competitions, like gurning or bog trotting or baseball. I mean, if you've got a room of people all saying "pig sooey" at each other they're either taking the piss or they've all had strokes.

Anyway, here's Nanine to show us how it's done. Souie Baby Souie is a 1964 novelty single, and I doubt you'll ever need to listen to it more than once. Let's just say that it has a jaw harp solo and leave it at that. Forever.

Nanine - Souie Baby Souie
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Aug. 18th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Visible Cloaks - Wheel

The duo of Spencer Doran and Ryan Carlile present us with a calming retrofuturistic vision. Their clear electronic tones and startling melodies are equal parts Lasry-Baschet and Simon Jeffes. This isn't some reductionist oversimplified musical vision though, their music is shot through with the buzz of life that only adds to its universality. Wheel comes from their 2017 album Lex and it is splendid stuff.

Visible Cloaks - Wheel
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Aug. 17th, 2019

cyberinsekt

B Boys - Energy

Like this quite a bit. Energy has the same insistent repetition and one-note energy of Parquet Courts, and a playful, disjointed approach to songwriting that harks back to classic post-punk. Music that's fun to be around, from the 2017 album Dada.

B Boys - Energy
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Aug. 16th, 2019

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The Ex - Knock

Critical consensus these days is that The Ex can do no wrong, have never put a foot out of place, etc. I think that's almost true. Some of their 1980s agitprop punk hasn't dated well, but even amongst the midst of that there are tracks like Knock. It springs back and forth, made of bass and feedback, all Fall-like urgency and the great drum tones of Katrin Ex. It's from their 1987 album Too Many Cowboys.

The Ex - Knock
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Aug. 15th, 2019

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Unknown - The Cowboy In Me

We're all very aware these days on the perils of sharing personal information online. It's almost as if those privacy-minded geeks who created the previous iterations of the modern net might have known what they were on about. It wasn't enough though to stop the less well-informed net users from making all sorts of things available.

Back when Napster and Audiogalaxy were still things, it was soon discovered that in addition to their mp3 libraries, some users were also sharing home recordings. There was a piece of software that by default saved everything recorded with a microphone as "mic in track - XXXXXX.mp3" and those of us in the know descended on these in the search of inadvertent gems. If you know where to look you can still find collections of these floating around, and at their best they're fascinating glimpses into other lives. At their worst, they're just children sticking microphones in their mouths and shouting, but hey, everyone's artistic journey has to begin somewhere I guess. Here's an unusually complete recording from my collection, an unknown guy singing along to Tim McGraw's The Cowboy In Me.

Unknown - The Cowboy In Me
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Aug. 14th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Rainforest Spiritual Enslavement - Bridgetown Dub

For years Dominick Fernow recorded as Prurient, creating an extensive discography of unforgiving noise. Since 2011 however he's also allowed himself time to record as Rainforest Spiritual Enslavement, making deep Demdike State/Haxan Cloak style dark ambient dub. Yet there's one constant sound running through this project, and it's not produced by any electronic kit. Rather it's the sound of rain and thunder, field recordings given ominous volume and space. Fernow has found a new way to tap into our fear, such as on the ghastly Bridgetown Dub from the EP Venus Flytrap Exotica (2019).

Rainforest Spiritual Enslavement - Bridgetown Dub
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Aug. 13th, 2019

cyberinsekt

People Like Us - Driving Flying Rising Falling

Is travel a luxury we can afford? It's been said that the first great emancipation of the working classes came when they were no longer tied to labouring on the lands which sustained them, beholden to the land owners. It's been said, and clearly also been forgotten, for why else would a people vote to restrict their own ability to do that? Brexit revealed a nation of freemen wanting to be villeins again.

As travel has lost its glamour perhaps we have forgotten its value, and perhaps only very lately understood its environmental cost. But in the world of People Like Us it is always the late 1960s. We're always in the living room with Radio 2 playing in the background and the smell of the chip pan wafting through from the kitchen. We're dreaming of somewhere else, anywhere else away from all this tedium. The music is at once our ticket out of here and the very dreary ticket back home.

The sources of Vicki Bennett's musical collages are at once transportative and utterly banal. Driving Flying Rising Falling comes from her 2011 release Welcome Abroad, and it's a night time medley of Blue Moon, Downtown and more. Everything's crammed together: a red triangular peg can go in a red circular hole because the colour is right, dissonance be damned. And maybe that's the trick to repolish some of the original glitz. The music's not going to catch the light without a few rough edges to sparkle. Here at Doklands we've long loved the playfulness of Bennett's work and the adept way she straddles cultural references, and sometimes it's easy to forget just how good her ear for a mix really is.

People Like Us - Driving Flying Rising Falling
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Aug. 12th, 2019

cyberinsekt

John Zorn - The Tower

The Hierophant (2019) is yet another John Zorn album on which Zorn doesn't actually play. As an old time fan who enjoyed Zorn's abrasive alto rasp I'll confess this again comes as a disappointment, but even I'll admit that there's an excuse for leaving out the sax when you're making a classic jazz trio album.

And there's certainly a fair amount of jazz tradition on display here. The album's closer, The Lovers, is full of romance and drama; if there were such things as jazz standards these days it could very easily turn into one. But much of the album is of rather more austere fare. Brian Marsella's piano is clean and precise, frequently eschewing harmony entirely for long streams of solo notes high on the right hand with little or no sustain. Such is the case with the frankly astonishing The Tower (yes, all the tracks are named after Tarot major arcana, unsurprising considering Zorn's interest in occult practice and Jewish mysticism). It's ferociously fast and complex, an unrelenting torrent of sound that is both invigorating and deliciously sinister. Exhilarating stuff, and wait till you hear the payoff.

John Zorn - The Tower
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Aug. 11th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Robert Ashley - She Was A Visitor / Minimal Man - She Was A Visitor

There is something uniquely eerie about the music of Robert Ashley. He's best known for his experimental operatic works of the 1960s and '70s, and they are instantly identifiable by their emotional detachment. None more so that She Was A Visitor (1967), in which a solo voice recites the title again and again, doing nothing else. The inflection is neutral and never varies, which would be creepy enough, but in addition the backing singers take individual phonemes from the phrase and stretch them out in wordless drones.

In other words, it's exactly the sort of thing that was ripe for a coldwave adaptation.

That was to come from Patrick Miller, AKA Minimal Man on his 1981 album The Shroud Of. It's not an entirely faithful take on the original. The vocals are heavily treated and grow to a frenetic pitch, but in their place the underlying blank synth riff takes the pace of the neutral recital. It's more dramatic and with it more accessible, yet it certainly captures much of the spirit of the original. Other Minimal Man tracks are a more familiar dark proto-industrial fare, but on this Miller was playing homage to his love of the classic avant-garde.

Robert Ashley - She Was A Visitor
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Minimal Man - She Was A Visitor
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Aug. 10th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Sarathy Korwar (feat. Delhi Sultanate & Prabh Deep) - Coolie

If like me you're mostly familiar with Sarathy Korwar from his album My East Is Your West, you're going to be surprised by his latest offering. Gone is the spiritual jazz and in comes the subcontinent hip hop. More Arriving (2019) is forward, irreverent and refreshingly satirical. Playing on gammon-flavoured fears of immigration, he works with a wide variety of Indian voices. On Coolie that's Punjabi rapper Prabh Deep and MC Delhi Sultanate. It's a real group performance though: Korwar's percussion might kick this into life but in no way dominates, and the offbeat barking sax from Emanative's Tamar Osborn is just about perfect. Busy as hell, but great with it.

Sarathy Korwar (feat. Delhi Sultanate & Prabh Deep) - Coolie
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Aug. 9th, 2019

cyberinsekt

MoHa! - It Burns Twice

The duo of Morten J Olsen and Anders Hana, aka MoHa!, are no more but while they lasted they were the experimental electronic brethren of Lightning Bolt. Full of fury and splatter and dubious taste, the Swedish pair are all about the noise rather than the melody. Some of their stuff abandons directly rhythmic drumming to create ambient sounds, using pads for a more painterly effect, but honestly I reckon they were at their strongest when they perpetrated a more full-on sonic assault. There's some of that on It Burns Twice, the opening track from One Way Ticket To Candyland (2008). Love those harsh judders.

MoHa! - It Burns Twice
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Aug. 8th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Robert Dick and Adam Caine - Short Term Memory

We've enjoyed the music of experimental flautist Robert Dick before here at Doklands. His album of solo contrabass flute works Our Cells Know is very much our sort of thing, but in no way prepared us for the shock that is Short Term Memory from the album The Damn Think (2019). It's a collaboration with guitarist Adam Caine that spits with invention and fury at every single moment.

It's also the sort of music that can clear a room faster than a canister of pepper spray, so treat with caution.

Short Term Memory has extravagent Phil Minton-esque vocalese, savage amplification, dirty static, graffitic sonic scrawling and yes, a flute. Diabolically intense and seldom pleasant, it's still utterly captivating and absorbing music, and an album to return to again and again.

Robert Dick and Adam Caine - Short Term Memory
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Aug. 7th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Lucy Railton - Gaslighter

Because it's such an amazing record, here's another piece from Lucy Railton's Paradise 94. The experimental cellist is in full industrial mode here, with the anglegrinding rasp of Gaslighter. She sounds like a Tardis grating away the edges of your soul, filling in the gouges with static and Caretaker-like ambience. Ridiculously powerful stuff, could perhaps do without the final electronic treatment but it's a suitable awe-inspiring climax.

Lucy Railton - Gaslighter
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Aug. 6th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Dog - Feral Hog pt. 1



Dog - Feral Hog pt. 1
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Aug. 5th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Blurt - Eat Up Your House

Eat Up Your House has almost everything you could want from a Blurt song. It's got the dissonance and jerky rhythms of their post-punk glory days, it's got barking saxophone and DIY percussion, it's got absurdist lyrics and musical dream logic. All it needs is the aggro of Ted Milton sounding as if he's suffocating inside a suit two sizes too small for him and it would be perfect. As it is it's pretty damn fine, and the closest thing you can get to Big Block 454 south of the Peak District. From the 1998 album Celebrating The Bespoke Cell Of Little Ease.

Blurt - Eat Up Your House
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Aug. 4th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Barbed - Dreams Dreams Dreams

Strictly speaking, Dreams Dreams Dreams is not by Barbed. Nobody knows who the performer is, or to be honest what the original title was. It was discovered by the band stuck on the end of an open reel tape they found in a jumble sale. An unknown and particularly genteel woman recites poetry over some reedy and ethereal backing music. She sounds as if she was a 1960s BBC children's television presenter, but her tale of unrequited and obsessive love is far too creepy for such a reserved tone of voice. It's full of a sweetness that resolutely refuses to acknowledge the pain of her situation and this makes for a genuinely rather disturbing listen.

Barbed - Dreams Dreams Dreams
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Aug. 3rd, 2019

cyberinsekt

Dean Blunt feat. Poison Anna - Beefa

I never could stand Hype Williams. It wasn't that I had a problem with irony, or distance, or archness. Nope, sorry to say that it was entirely the sound that they made, that greasy slick polish. They sounded like a bad jpeg. Thankfully that seems to have been left behind in the later work of Dean Blunt. Beefa comes from his 2018 EP Soul On Fire and it's a take on 18th century parlour music via the dancefloors of, well, Ibitha. It's courtly and graceful and crashingly obvious, as all such things have ever been.

Dean Blunt feat. Poison Anna - Beefa
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Aug. 2nd, 2019

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The Books - That Right Ain't Shit

Just a bit of folktronica for you today. Well, I say just but there was considerable joy to be found in the music of The Books. The duo of Nick Zammuto and Paul de Jong made music that was equal parts Squarepusher and Penguin Café Orchestra. That Right Ain't Shit from The Lemon Of Pink (2003) sounds like a glitchy harpsichord warming up and getting into groove. The interlocking rhythms seem to mesh so tightly that the warm swells are inevitable. And then, just like that it's gone, leaving nothing behind but a fond memory and a backward glance.

The Books - That Right Ain't Shit
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Aug. 1st, 2019

cyberinsekt

Ausustus Pablo - Shake Up

Just a quickie today, a classic cut from Augustus Pablo's 1974 Ital Dub. It's engineered by King Tubby and has Tommy Cowan on production stretching out the minimal orchestration into a full spectrum cannabinoid timeslip. Best of all though is that trademark Augustus Pablo melodica, as he takes what is essentially a kid's plastic toy and makes it haunting.

Ausustus Pablo - Shake Up
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Jul. 31st, 2019

cyberinsekt

The Tape-Beatles - Sing Sing Sing (Sing Sing)

One of the things I've always loved about The Tape-Beatles is that while they were pioneers of cut-ups and plunderphonics, they were also fond of very bad jokes. Sing Sing Sing (Sing Sing) is one of those - a pun that takes the song made famous by Benny Goodman and adding news reports on crimes that might have ended up landing someone in Sing Sing prison. You get the drum-heavy swing music and the pulpish commentary and the whole thing ends up being very '30s gangster. It's from the plagiartastic 1989 release A Subtle Buoyancy Of Pulse.

The Tape-Beatles - Sing Sing Sing (Sing Sing)
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