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Nov. 11th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Rufus Thomas - Tiger Man (King of the Jungle)

You think you know someone. You think, oh that Rufus Thomas, a bit of a rhythm and blues pioneer sure, but all those novelty records he released were a bit hokey. Sure they were fun, but they were little more than cheese.

And then you put on his 1953 song Tiger Man (undoubtedly a novelty song) and it opens with a raw yell, pounding drums, and a guitar line that's pure Café Oto. It soon establishes a more familiar pattern but for a moment there it's as if you're listening to 75 Dollar Bill. Rufus Thomas certainly put entertainment ahead of art a lot of the time, but this is as exciting a performance as you're going to hear anywhere.

Rufus Thomas - Tiger Man (King of the Jungle)
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Nov. 10th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Vessel - Kin to Coal

Here's another cut from producer Sebastian Gainsborough under his guise as Vessel. It's a piece of shuddering industrial electronics, the sound of a turbine hall attempting throat singing. It's wounded and tired and has the kind of sub-bass dubtones that strike terror. Kin to Coal is from the 2014 album Punish, Honey.

Vessel - Kin to Coal
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Nov. 9th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Sunwatchers - Greeneyed Pigmen (Get The Blade)

At first sight most people peg zombie pigmen for monsters. Not trying to excuse this sort of false assumption, but it's an easy mistake to make, what with their exposed ribcages and indecipherable grunts. Truth is they're a peaceful people, happy to wander aimlessly about the nether. They can be seen dancing around the lava falls and rolling playfully in patches of the indigenous netherwort fungus. In adulthood their eyes have become monochrome, but the young retain their natural green pigment into adolescence when they start to instead carry their ceremonial golden swords.

The precise details of this coming of age ritual have yet to be recorded, though some clues are present in Greeneyed Pigmen (Get The Blade) from the album Illegal Moves (2019). It's unashamedly rockist, with the rest of the band laying down an extended bed for Jim McHugh's lysergic soloing. Caustic and beautiful and unafraid, and ready to give the beating of a lifetime to any fash bastard who fancies their chances against the pigmen.

Sunwatchers - Greeneyed Pigmen (Get The Blade)
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Nov. 8th, 2019

cyberinsekt

The Bobby McGees - Wovon Man Nicht Sprechen Kann, Daruber Mus Man Schwen

And that's a bonus point from the judges for misquoting Wittgenstein. Here at Doklands we love the blackhearted feyness of The Bobby McGees. Eleanor Callaghan and James Cairney purport to be cynical and detached about their own romance while being blindly reverent regarding everyone else's, which is an utterly charming stance. Protected from awkward feelings by an impenetrable armour of irony, Wovon Man Nicht Sprechen Kann, Daruber Mus Man Schwen mixes ukulele and baroque recorder, indie twee and repulsive introspection. Like so many of the best things in life it's from the 2009 album L'Appropriation Bourgoisie De La Bobby McGees.

The Bobby McGees - Wovon Man Nicht Sprechen Kann, Daruber Mus Man Schwen
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Nov. 7th, 2019

cyberinsekt

The Slackers - Munsters Theme

For years the only fact I could remember about veteran New York ska band The Slackers was that they sang that song about Andre The Giant having a posse. Thanks to diligent research I can now also tell you that they recorded a cover the theme tune to The Munsters. It would have been tricky to out-camp the gothic surf horror of the original; this is a minute of dissonant backbeat goodtime music and nothing more.

The Slackers - Munsters Theme
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Nov. 6th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Matthew Halsall - Journey in Satchidananda

It takes a lot of guts to cover a tune as revered as Journey in Satchidananda. The biggest change that Matthew Halsall and the Gondwana Orchestra make here is to entirely do away with the tanpura drone. I'd always considered it an essential part of the original, the earth from which the bass digs that rolling organic rhythm. Actually, with its absence it gives drummer Gaz Hughes space to make some amazing cymbal textures, the mist from which this track emerges. Absolutely phenomenal recording, terrific fidelity from the team at the BBC's Maida Vale studio.

Matthew Halsall - Journey in Satchidananda
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Nov. 5th, 2019

cyberinsekt

High Rise - Induced Depression

Look, we might be doing okay for psychedelic noise metal these days, but believe me in the 1980s it was in short supply. That's why bands like High Rise were so crucial. Induced Depression was first released on Psychedelic Speed Freaks (1984) and in its original form it's an impressive blast of noise but sounds like it was recorded on a cheap cassette several miles away from the speaker stacks. Thankfully the 1997 compilation Psychedelic Speed Freaks '84-'85 offers a much sharper, more present version taken from the original sessions. It would be difficult to overstate how much guitarist Narita Munehiro shreds on this cut. If you love it when Acid Mothers Temple wig out, this is part of the same lineage as that exhilarating sandblast sound.

High Rise - Induced Depression
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Nov. 4th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Robotic Intergalactic Astro-Artists - Salvador Dali Teaches Rex Harrison How To Say 'Butterfly'

The Robotic Intergalactic Astro-Artists (or as they're more often known, the RIAA) emerged from the legendary outsider music blog Music For Maniacs back in 2007. Their album Sounds For The Space-Set!! is full of some of the most egregious mashup sins ever, a pitchbent soup of the kitsch and the avant-garde. All of your favourites get thrown into the mix on an album that starts with Sun Ra and ends with a disco version of the Star Trek theme. (And no, it's not the Charles Randolph Grean one.)

It's an album of impossible riches and even more impossible harmonic clashes, and it's difficult to pick just one track for you. However, I've become most fond of Salvador Dali Teaches Rex Harrison How To Say 'Butterfly', with Harrison trying to mimic Dali's extravagant pronunciation. All of this gets mixed up with some space age Moog from Dick Hyman and the Chicks on Speed cover of Wordy Rappinghood. It carries the same sort of preposterous delight that the best People Like Us cut-ups do. Not to be missed.

RIAA (Robotic Intergalactic Astro-Artists) - Salvador Dali Teaches Rex Harrison How To Say 'Butterfly'
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Nov. 3rd, 2019

cyberinsekt

Klaus Flouride - Dominating Baby

Klaus Flouride might want to play bass for the Dead Kennedys, but that's not really the point. What he wants doesn't come into it. What he's going to do is worship at the feet of his goddess and hope she allows him to play anything at all. And that does mean anything. If it will prove his devotion to her he will sing toothless scat over an old-timey ragtime tune. Dominating Baby is a typically odd number from his 1988 solo album Because I Say So.

Klaus Flouride - Dominating Baby
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Nov. 2nd, 2019

cyberinsekt

Fews - Business Man

Into Red is the 2019 album by Fews, full of motorik rhythms and the tense, spiky dissonance of post-punk. There's never a moment of release on Business Man, it's unrelenting and unbroken. The top shirt button is done up right until the moment of collapse, that's the way of business.

Fews - Business Man
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Nov. 1st, 2019

cyberinsekt

David Borden - Esty Point, Summer 1978

David Borden was the founder of... no I can't bring myself to type the words. Gotta steel myself, gotta get the old cut and paste fingers working again, it's easier if I don't have to hit those keys. David Borden was the founder of Mother Mallard's Portable Masterpiece Company. Look, I know they were an important early synth group. I know they were among the first to play composers such as Glass, Reich and Riley. But that's a diabolically awful name and there's no way in hell anyone should ever be allowed to forget it.

By the time 1981 arrived, Mother Mallard were long gone, and Borden released his first album of solo works. The functionally titled Music for Amplified Keyboard Instruments is part Tangerine Dream, part classic minimalism. Here's the opening track, Esty Point, Summer 1978, which seems to be progressing with a calm and hypnotic logic until some bizarre modulations send it off into the sinister.

David Borden - Esty Point, Summer 1978
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Oct. 31st, 2019

cyberinsekt

Henry Flynt - Double Spindizzy

Double Spindizzy is one of the more disorienting bits of music you'll hear. Written by Henry Flynt it's characterised by two violins see-sawing away in extreme stereo separation. I know of a couple of versions from the albums Graduation And Other New Country And Blues Music and New American Ethnic Music, Volume 2: Spindizzy. The first has a country blues number on guitar and bass running straight down the middle of it, the second is rather more fragmented, as if the bus has driven past and you're trying to reconstruct its passing by its tracks. Honestly, I've always been fonder of the first one. There's just something about that austere avant-garde experimentalism sitting side by side with a more conventional musical drive that really works. It's like a particularly good fairground ride. Flynt has always been one of the most interesting figures associated with the early Fluxus and minimalist schools, and his formidable rep makes easy to hide just how fucking great his music could be.

Henry Flynt - Double Spindizzy
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Oct. 30th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Mary Lattimore - Never Saw Him Again

Take up your harps and throw off the restraints of austerity, embrace once more the aesthetic maximalism of those oddly glowing women in those pre-Raphelite portraits. That's where Mary Lattimore's harp belongs, in a Dante Gabriel Rossetti fever dream of loop pedals and reverb and backward masking. Sure she can make her harp sound like a tinkling brook etc etc but she can also build a psychedelic choral edifice around it. Never Saw Him Again comes from the album Hundreds Of Days (2018) and it's dense, lush and sensuous. Take that, windswept moorlands.

Mary Lattimore - Never Saw Him Again
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Oct. 29th, 2019

cyberinsekt

The Shoes - A Mystical Madness

It's time to gather around the sacred drum circle and break out the flute and the rainsticks. There we sit in communion with the planet and all its glory and what the fuck is that? Is that The Shoes? They smell of booze and drugs and they appear to be screaming about goblins and hit dice and one of THEM just called ME a nerd. Fuck you buddy, may the universe rain down chaos and discord upon you, see how you like that.

Oh, you appear to be fine with it.

Carry on then.

A Mystical Madness comes from the album Growling In Slow Motion (2018). The Shoes are the chads and you are the virgins, you bunch of losers.

The Shoes - A Mystical Madness
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Oct. 28th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Gøggs - Still Feeding

Ah, I so love the punk of Gøggs. It's one of Ty Segall's many projects, and on Still Feeding they're far less garagey than you might expect given their pedigree. Martial drumming, doomy chasms, and post-punk abrasive juddering is a lot to fit into two minutes, but they're more than up for the task. From the 2018 release Pre Strike Sweep.

Gøggs - Still Feeding
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Oct. 27th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Thrangh - Asa Nisi Masa

Awesome jazzcore thrashing and flailing from the magnificent Thrangh. Quite criminal that they only released so few records: one self released album, and then the unforgettable Erzefilisch (2007). They took the very notion of riffing and ripped it to shreds, creating abrasive momentum and then tearing it down thanks in large to the disruptive drumming of Tommaso Moretti. Asa Nisi Masa is gloriously fucked up, alternating between stream of conciousness splatter and slow burning build, punk and prog in equal measure.

Thrangh - Asa Nisi Masa
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Oct. 26th, 2019

cyberinsekt

The Durutti Column - Bordeaux

Maybe Vini Reilly and Bruce Mitchell had a formula to their music, or maybe it just seemed that way because nobody else ever made music their way. The sensuous drumming, the distant vocals, but mostly the unparalleled cleanliness and emotion of the guitar made The Durutti Column's music immediately recognisable. Bordeaux is a just about perfect example from the band's underappreciated third album Another Setting (1983).

The Durutti Column - Bordeaux
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Oct. 25th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Sneaks - PBNJ

Eva Moolchan is not trying to impress you. She makes sparse post-punk pop with only a bass and a drum machine, and sings in an offhand and disaffected manner. She knows she's singing the truth, no need to dress it up all fancy. Atypically melodic for us here at Doklands, but the sort of thing it's hard to listen to without smiling. PBNJ is taken from the 2017 album It's a Myth.

Sneaks - PBNJ
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Oct. 24th, 2019

cyberinsekt

Ana Roxanne - Immortality

Taking cues from Catholic and Hindustani traditions of sacred music, Ana Roxanne makes works of quiet purpose. There's nothing accidental about the reverberant ambience in which she places crackle and hum, or unresolved electronic gamelans, or as on Immortality choral singing and warm keyboard drones. It's unfashionably serious and all the better for it. Find it on her 2019 debut album ~~~.

Ana Roxanne - Immortality
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Oct. 23rd, 2019

cyberinsekt

Uzeda - The Preacher's Tale

You'd be forgiven for not knowing who Uzeda are. How long do most people keep up with new musical releases? 5 years perhaps, 10 a rare outlier? Uzeda just released their first album in 13 years, and they were never that well known to begin with. Steve Albini knew them though, and well he might because this Italian outfit were undoubtedly one of the earliest post-rock bands. Their knotty, gnarly punk always eschewed easy rhythmic or emotional conclusions, and honestly I reckon their latest album Quocumque Jeceris Stabit might be their finest yet. Here's the final track, the craggy and devastating The Preacher's Tale.

Uzeda - The Preacher's Tale
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